Movies

Everything That’s Wrong With Film Critics

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The release of Batman V Superman this past weekend has caused many to wonder whether film critics have any weight on the viewer’s decisions. It’s probably not a new topic of debate, but it gives me the chance of making a brief reflection on the role of the critic.

First things first, let it be known that I bought a ticket for the Zack Snyder movie and went and watched it. I didn’t like it, mainly because I thought it was stupid. But that’s the full extent of my opinion, and whatever else I might have to say about it will be delivered to friends over beers. (I also made a mean tweet about it, but if you don’t want any spoilers, you shouldn’t look at it—no matter how silly the spoiler in question may seem—.)

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Screenwriting

Welcoming Amazon Storywriter

Thank you, Amazon. I’m impressed. This time more than ever before. (And I haven’t even seen The Man In The High Castle yet.)

A couple of hours ago, an e-mail popped up in my inbox under the subject line “Announcing Amazon Storywriter.” The link took me onto a web-based word processor specifically designed for professional screenplay format.

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Movies

The Grand Budapest Hotel

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After I finished watching Wes Anderson’s latest delicacy, I made the following note. It came back to my mind afterwards, and I retrieve it here hoping to learn whether others felt the same way about it.

I believe the deeper meaning of THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL hides in the tribute to those stories that mean everything for those who were their protagonists and then passed on to others, and disfigured and diluted over time, as if obscured by layers and layers of dust, [faded] until they became only endearing anecdotes to those who heard or read them. Enchanting, but meaningless. 

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Footnote: I thought Moonrise Kingdom superior to The Grand Budapest Hotel, but I still enjoyed the latter immensely.

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Screenwriting

Script Problems

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Click to Expand

If there ever was something smarter than learning from one’s errors, that would be learning from other people’s errors too. (They can often be the same ones, granted.) Late last year, FastCo.Create and The Blackboard published an infographic displaying data gathered by an anonymous script reader. “Over 300 scripts from 5 different studios” constituted the sample. Besides some merely circumstantial stats such as genre, heroes’ and villain’s (and writers’) sex, or page count —or the surprising and incomprehensible fact that 2 of those 300 scripts were located in “the endless skies” (sic)—, the most interesting conclusions are the Recurring script problems, listed in descending order of frequency. I do this beating my own chest in the first place, because when we try to “design the perfect script” is when we usually fall in all these common places.

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Screenwriting

Some of the Most Interesting Scripts of 2013

Reading film scripts is always one of the (many) jobs of those who want to end up writing them — although, as The Mystery Exec once said, it’s also good to pick up a book every once in a while. In any case, as we get to the end of the year, here are some of the most interesting (not necessarily “best”) scripts of 2013. You can find a broader selection on Scott Myer’s Go Into The Story.

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Entertainment Industry

Professionals In The “New” Entertainment Industry

In three years of film school, every single professor remembered to mention how the industry is changing, and how we shouldn’t miss out on those changes. The digital world is upon as, they’d say. Questions about the future of film and TV arise. Whether the traditional models of distribution and exhibition will remain or not. Whether the traditional path for a filmmaker is the same today as it will be tomorrow.

This strikes me as particularly important when it comes to prepare college students for their profession in the entertainment industry. After having studied a little bit the general landscape of our beloved showbiz, I’ve come to a few conclusions, which I presented earlier today to the faculty of the Department of Film, TV & Digital Media at University of Navarre.

Here you can download the full PDF in better quality: “Entertainment Professionals In The New Industry.

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